Back of the napkin proof: Why Engineers will always earn less than Managers.

Back of the napkin "proof" of why Engineers will always earn less than managers

Back of the napkin “proof” of why Engineers will always earn less than managers

Finally, mathematical proof that highly trained Engineers with knowledge across many disciplinary boundaries — will always earn less than management.

Understanding the proof requires a “pre-calculus’ understanding of basic math. This of course implies that managers, no matter how hard they try can ever actually understand what we’re saying.

And we Engineers, being a fraternity of the under-appreciated, will never, ever tell them. Why? Well, simply because we really actually love what we do. And we’d do it even if they weren’t paying us.  (Shhh!!)

Free internet research tool online — big data.

Filtering for US and for appliances I was surprised to snag this current stat: 85% of use internet user have a smartphone and use it online. Is your website mobile ready?!!

Filtering for US and for appliances I was surprised to snag this current stat: 85% of use internet users have a smartphone and use it online.

Is your website mobile ready?!!

Thanks Google.

http://www.consumerbarometer.com/

Make your own charts, test your theories.  Because this is Google, the presumption is the enormous database and statistics behind the results assure a level of interest that isn’t available elsewhere.

No, seriously.  Thanks Google.

Astounding. Share your surprises here.

Google’s “Android One” – Phone for the 2nd & 3rd World Customer

Built in the countries they are sold, Google has enormous profit margin advantages and stands to outsell Apple by orders of magnitudes - 10's of millions of units globally.

Built in the countries they are sold, Google has enormous profit margin advantages and stands to outsell Apple by orders of magnitudes – 10’s of millions of units globally.

Elsewhere in this blog I’ve noted with interest that some of the biggest companies on the planet are taking aim at supplying emerging markets where extreme growth is due to literally explode in coming years.

Corroborating this mega-trend is Googles’ launch of the “Android One” phone.

Curt Prins, Mobile Strategist, explains some of the deeper and very interesting details in a fascinating post on LinkedIn.com.  Curt notes:

Instead of adapting to price sensitivities within emerging markets, Apple’s iPhone 6 starts at $649 (without contract) and tops out at $949. That’s an impossible purchase when the average household income in India is just US$7,700.

Talk about barriers to market entry!

Google’s Android One launched in India this week for just $105, and carrier subsidies will drive that price down into the $60s. Amazon India’s massive inventory sold out in a matter of hours. Google understands what works in Mountain View might not in Mumbai or Manila.

Notice the order of magnitude difference in price?

Anyway I completely agree with his assessment that data costs outstrip the costs of hardware — and keep users from going with smartphones.  This is why some of what http://www.internet.org is doing is so important. Curt notes:

Google has also eliminated OS access from wireless carriers–like Apple did with AT&T seven years ago. Google took it a step further by understanding the great expense of mobile data for most users within India. They partnered with Airtel to allow Android One users to get free OS updates for the first six months—in time for a critical update to their more energy-efficient Android L OS. These users will also get up to 200MB of free data for app downloads per month.

I still don’t know how this will affect me and my teeny business, but I expect it will.  Noticing that it is happening hopefully prepares me to position myself earlier than some who have become completely enamored with Apple and the iPhone 6 launch here in the US and seem blind that the market of billions of users remains untapped.

Investors that bought Alibaba this week?  Smell the same opportunities.

 

 

Internet.org – Redoubling Efforts

6 of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in Africa.  Big business has noticed, and understands that getting online will drive product and service sales.

6 of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in Africa. Big business has noticed, and understands that getting online will drive product and service sales.

Worth reviewing this weekend…

News about Internet.org creating free network access for users:

PCWorld.com News Article July 31, 2014

The position http://internet.org develops comes from the basic statistic:

Only 1 out of every 3 people can go online.

Why aren’t more people connected?

  • Devices are too expensive.
  • Service plans are too expensive.
  • There’s no mobile network to connect to.
  • Content isn’t available in the local language.
  • Awareness of the value of internet is limited.
  • Availability of power sources is limited.
  • Networks can’t support large amounts of data.

Internet.org urges:

“Together we can remove these barriers and give billions of people the power to connect.”

Social Collaboration in the Agile Age

Engaging collaborators in the Agile Age -- requires fluent Social Media skill

Engaging collaborators in the Agile Age — requires fluent Social Media skill

Read with interest an article published on how Social Media has affected collaboration among Software Developer communities.

It’s being called the “Agile Age.”

What’s interesting to me is that it’s been my experience that the methods used by developers and engineers eventually percolate down to the rest of us.  For instance, in the 80’s as an engineer myself, I was utterly dependent on BBS (Bulletin Board Systems) for support.  And then BBS’s showed up in all sorts of places — Gardening communities, Radio Controlled Model Airplane nuts, every area of interest had one.

And I can see some of this happening again in Social Media– as a consultant, I’m ever more aware that my work depends upon diverse resources, near-instant responses and all of this across a variety of appliances (from desktops to tablets and phones.)

Social Media and Responsive webs are making this all possible.

Encryption — Email is next

Encryption

Fundamentals. Basic encryption entails injecting a random data string … to obfuscate the real contents of the message or packet.

Reading through my feeds, I see recent posts from various sources that Google, Facebook and others are beginning to realize that:

Server to Server encryption of Email messages is never going to be secure.

TLS (Transport Layer Security) – a minimal implementation that allows servers to converse and exchange messages more securely — is not adopted in a high percentage of email servers across the internet.  Something in excess of 40% of Email servers don’t answer this protocol.

250px-Public_key_shared_secret.svgWhat can be done?

For starters: Personal Encryption.

See this Wikipedia Article for some remedial reading — we all need to understand this layer of engineering language.  Relax, there’s lots of pictures.

I’m committed to bringing this topic to the blog on a regular basis.  We’ll try to keep track of what’s being done, and how to easily adopt the best practices.

My forecast is that Services — Google to Facebook, many others will adopt a paradigm that supports personal encryption in various layers — including service to service.  At least you’d know, if you’re sharing credentials and info between a Blog, Facebook and Google (as I do now) that those channels would be secure.   This is big iron taking seriously our privacy needs.

Go man, Go!

True broadband Internet Access – Modeled as a Public Utility!

GoFiberUtah.Org home page.

GoFiberUtah.Org home page.

GoFiberUtah.org is advancing a new form of Information Highway Utility.  I’ll call it an IUC for Internet Utility Company.

In this example GoFiberUtah.Org is the precursor agency that is doing the precursor plumbing  and politics that will birth a Public / Private partnership, creating an IUC that will extend “Fiber to the Home” – and of course – businesses in their service area.

Visionary, to an extent.  This has happened before in different scenarios but this is the first instance that get’s close to a workable, scalable, sustainable implementation.

A fascinating component of the service proposal will be that “Basic” Access will be provided by the IUC to each “Address” in the network for free.

Read the Executive Summary for yourself!

Thrive on change!